I’d Never Missed a Deadline Before—Until I Missed My Own

by | Aug 8, 2022 | Articles | 0 comments

I’ll be the first to acknowledge my willingness to write about the newsletter I send to my email list. In fact, I know I’ve done it more than once.

Back in February, I offered readers of this blog a “sneak peek” at the quarterly newsletter—the joke being that it wasn’t really a sneak peek, since I’d sent it to my subscribers the previous day. I guess my sly method of enrolling more people to my list wasn’t so sly after all. 

A few months before that, I also posted about the newsletter. However, I entitled the post Got Those Old Indie Author Newsletter Blues, as I felt a bit melancholy about my (perfectly logical) decision to reduce the newsletter’s frequency from monthly to quarterly.

 

About That Whole Deadline Thing

My rationale for changing the frequency was that I don’t always have “author news” every month, and my blues had more to do with the lack of protest from subscribers than anything else. I hadn’t expected anyone to cry, “No, Mike, we need to hear from you monthly!” Still, it was a small blow to the ego.

Now, I’ve always published the newsletter on the 6th of the month. I don’t even recall picking that day for a particular reason, though it’s worth noting that my birthday is November 6th. (I like chocolate. You can send all packages to P.O. Box 46506…) And I don’t think I’ve ever published the newsletter late, though it’s certainly easier to write them four times a year rather than twelve.

I’m the kind of writer who works well under pressure, and though I actually have missed deadlines before, they were never my fault.

That sounds bad. I know. Allow me to explain.

Back in the day, I had a job where projects periodically came to me on a last-minute basis. Sometimes, my client would fail to provide any of the information I needed to write their article, even as the deadline loomed. I missed a few of those deadlines, for the simple reason that creating a working draft of an article with zero source material was not feasible. My client, in those cases, missed their deadline, which meant the goal posts of my deadline had to be moved.

 

But The Newsletter Is Different…Right?

All this to say that I missed my own self-imposed deadline this past weekend. 

Although it’s much easier to write only four newsletters per year, I still forgot about my newsletter this weekend. Completely.

It’s even on my iCal: Quarterly newsletter out. Still, I forgot.

This past weekend consisted of grocery shopping, laundry, and errands—not the most glamorous of excuses, but there you have it.

I don’t know that my subscribers will notice the difference, as it is, after all, now quarterly…unless you, reading this, are a subscriber. In that case: sorry. 

But I’ll send it late. And that, my friends, is how I missed my own, self-imposed deadline.

Ever miss a deadline? Got a story about it? Feel free to share in the comments below.

technophobia

Technophobia: A Writer’s Confession

To today's computer-savvy readers, "technophobia" might sound like a quaint leftover from the 20th century. You remember, right? Back in the 1980s, guys like me wrote poems of dismay about the invasion of technology into the arts. I still remember the words I penned...
political

Navigating the Murky Waters of Political Correctness

“If you don't have a sense of humor, it just isn't funny.”  —Wavy Gravy   When it comes to political correctness, I’m not convinced we should go back to the “good old days.” I mean, do we really want to go back to calling someone born to an unwed mother a...
characters

It All Starts With Character

“Sahno offers a compelling vision of a community whose need for companionship and support in the face of life's struggles is stirring.” “The characters are deep, well thought out…” “I read this novel in a few short days, drawn in by a believable plot and characters...

Goin’ Home

About a million years ago, I read a Peanuts cartoon quoting Thomas Wolfe: "You can't go home again." Perhaps fifteen years later, I discovered Wolfe in a lit class, and read Look Homeward, Angel. Eventually, I also got through You Can't Go Home Again, along with a few...
twitter

Best Accounts to Follow on Twitter

Recently I wrote a blog post about how many writers struggle to find interesting topics. It occurred to me that, for those of us who are writers and/or entrepreneurs, one good topic for this blog might be Best Accounts to Follow on Twitter. Of course, this is totally...
money

Do What You Love, and the Money Will Follow…Right?

Recently, I was reading a post from an online trainer who coaches authors and other professionals. This trainer discusses the contrast between writing for money and writing for passion. In other words, the age-old conundrum: if you do what you love, will the money...
travel

Travel Feeds the Soul

"A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving." - Lao Tzu I wish I could say I've always loved to travel. Maybe I'm good at being in a different place; the getting there is sometimes a whole other story. Traveling to a foreign locale can be...

Five Mistakes New Authors Make

Every author starts as a newbie, even if they held a job as a writer in some other capacity. The publishing business can be incredibly daunting for a newcomer: many authors work alone without much feedback, so their mistakes, while understandable, are also far too...
phooey

Hong Kong Phooey and The Casual Racism of the 70s

As kids, my brother and I used to love The Rocky & Bullwinkle Show, which ran from the late 50s to the early 70s. The cartoon featured Boris & Natasha, a.k.a., Boris Badenov and Natasha Fatale, as in “bad enough” and “femme fatale.” The former was a pun on the...
story

The Power of Story

It’s been a noisy week in Tampa… In the mid-1990s, I felt like I had a surplus of free time. A new transplant to Florida, I worked a menial job in a mortgage company, spent my evenings tightening up two out of my three Great American Novels, and trying to live a bit...
self-promotion

What’s The Problem With Shameless Self-Promotion?

While I still find it somewhat hard to believe, I've been on Twitter for almost eight years. I know this not only because Twitter shows Joined March 2015 on my profile but also because, even if they eliminate that feature, I use a tracker called Who Unfollowed Me? If...
MLK

MLK Day 2023

Here’s wishing everyone a safe, sane Martin Luther King Jr. Day. For many of us, today is always something of a day of mourning: not only mourning the loss of a great civil rights leader, but also mourning the turn our great nation seemed to take in recent years....

Twitter Tips for Authors in 2023

If you follow my blog, you probably connected with me via Twitter, whether you’re a fellow author or not. In 2020, I wrote a post about Twitter for fellow writers that got a good response. Three years later, the landscape has changed, but some Twitter best practices...
rails

Going Off The Rails (But Not On A Crazy Train)

Last April, I wrote a blog post called Back on Track With a Work-In-Progress. Part of that post was to talk about the difference between a “plotter” and a “pantser” (and to describe myself as a hybrid of the two, a “plantser”). Another, less obvious motive, was to...
French

Those Tricky French Authors and Their Obsessions

Today’s blog post was originally going to be Write Whatever the @#$% You Want, Pt. III. However, after seeing parts I and II lined up, I decided to call an audible and make it something less repetitive. Somehow the SEO gods have gotten into my head. As I’ve mentioned...
scared

Write Whatever the @#$% You Want, Pt. II

In last week’s post, I mentioned a pretty well-known author who has publicly reported his publisher “wouldn’t touch” a new release, in part because a character in his novel referred to herself as “fat.” I heard this story on a podcast, and I remember thinking, “Wait...
censorship

Write Whatever the @#$% You Want

I’ve been stewing on this for a while. It’s been brewing for quite a while. I could probably write a song about it (how about a rap?), but I don’t think I will. This is more of a blog post topic, and it might even deserve a series. And that’s the title and topic of...
gratitude

Should Every Month Be Gratitude Month?

When I was a kid, I loved Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. I read it daily and collected nearly every paperback volume of the cartoon, so I could see what I’d missed since the comic strip’s inception in 1950.  Certain things stuck: quotes like “happiness is a warm puppy”...
robot

More Thoughts On Robot Writers and The Tech Dystopia

A couple of months ago, I wrote a blog post here called When Will the Robot Overlords Replace Us? Apparently, I’m fairly obsessed with this stuff, because every time I come here and empty my brain, it seems to come up again. Today is no different. Part of the reason,...