Our Broken Healthcare System Vs. The Decent, Affordable Healthcare of a Developing Nation

Our Broken Healthcare System Vs. The Decent, Affordable Healthcare of a Developing Nation

Is your country’s health care system an egregious scam that bilks patients out of their money?

Mine is.

I didn’t have a blog post topic planned for today, but a bill that showed up in my mailbox changed that in a hurry.

I’ve been talking about this anecdotally to friends for years, so let’s get into it. I’ll start with my story about visiting an emergency room in Bangkok, Thailand.

 

What’s the Opposite of Sticker Shock?

If you think a trip to the ER in a developing country will be a guaranteed nightmare, think again.

My wife is from Thailand, so I should know more than the average American about that particular country. Certain things, however, I’ve had to learn along the way.

In 2013, I was visiting my wife’s family with her, but I got sick right before I left. Nothing more exciting than taking 22 hours’ worth of consecutive flights with a developing sinus infection. Good times!

By the time I arrived in Thailand, I knew I’d need something for my sinuses. I told my wife, and she said, We have to go to the hospital.

Hospital? Oh, no, no, no. This is just a sinus infection. You can imagine my horror at the thought. I pictured a typical American ER, filled with dour patients waiting for hours on end—the whole nine yards.

Much to my surprise, within a short while I found myself seated across from a pleasant medical doctor who provided multiple prescriptions—including an allergy med in case my symptoms were from exposure to some local flora—and then, after a quick detour to the hospital pharmacy for said medications, we were out the door.

Total time: 45 minutes.

Total out-of-pocket cost: about 50 bucks.

 

Cha-Ching! Let’s Get Money from an Insurance Company—And from that Patient.

So, back to today’s bill.

Three visits to an orthopedic doctor’s office. Two cortisone shots, one physical therapy appointment.

Guess how much. Go ahead.

Five hundred? A thousand?

Try $2,600.

I know I’m getting old, because I’ve bought cars that cost less than that. But really? Two—actually, closer to three—grand?

I called them up because there was an error on the bill, though not one that would change the total by much. And, of course, my out-of-pocket cost is still several hundred bucks, even with insurance. The nice lady had a conversation with me about “adjustments” they made after I commented about the egregious amount the doctor charges for a consultation.

Let’s see: he charges a $600 office fee to the insurance company for that glorious 45 seconds he spent with me. But then, the nice lady says, it was adjusted by a whole $475!

Right, so really, he “only” charged $125 for the office visit, if you look at it that way.

I don’t look at it that way.

As I see it, he charged $125 for a 45-second consultation. Let’s be generous: call it a full minute.

I did the math. Sixty seconds multiplied by $125 is $7,500 per hour.

Yes, I’m retiring to Thailand with my wife one day. And I cannot wait to get out of our broken, price-gouging, for-profit garbage healthcare system.

Short Story Contest Part III

Happy Labor Day, everybody! To celebrate, I’m posting part III of a short story I’m including in an upcoming collection. If you haven’t already played along, check out parts I & II from the last two weeks. The person who sends in the most helpful suggestion or...
political

Navigating the Murky Waters of Political Correctness

“If you don't have a sense of humor, it just isn't funny.”  —Wavy Gravy   When it comes to political correctness, I’m not convinced we should go back to the “good old days.” I mean, do we really want to go back to calling someone born to an unwed mother a...
coming-of-age

Dreams, Memories, And Growing Up One Day At A Time

We use up too much artistry in our dreams—and therefore often are impoverished during the day. - Friedrich Nietzsche, The Wanderer and His Shadow   Boy, ole Nietzsche really had it right, didn’t he? Last night I went through mental movies that ranged from being...
game of thrones

3 Reasons the End of Game of Thrones is an Example of Good Storytelling

Social media is interesting: every time an artist or entertainer creates a new work, it’s going to get mixed reviews. Even in the case of a highly popular TV series like Game of Thrones, the armchair critics come out with their claws sharpened—especially when...
happy new year

Happy New Year From Mike Sahno – Author. Speaker. Publisher.

Today was the last day of 2018, and it's also my last blog post of the year. I almost missed it. One of the only reasons I've had success as an author, speaker and publisher is because I've been both relentless and consistent. I used to think my natural, God-given...
creativity

New “Writer Problems” Series, Topic #5: Creativity vs. Money

One of the most daunting questions amateur writers face is whether they can make money following their most creative pursuits. Are they too non-commercial? Will an agent be interested? Will my work sell at all? The question of Creativity vs. Money isn’t relevant for...
family

Forget the Big “Family & Friends” Plan

About three months ago, I wrote a post entitled What I’ve Learned In Six Years of Growing An Indie Author Business. My idea was to share six lessons from my publishing experience, one for each year in the biz. As time went on, my thinking evolved. I realized these six...
department

Yes, I’m The Head of My Company’s Marketing Department

A few months ago, I wrote a post called What I’ve Learned In Six Years of Growing An Indie Author Business. The idea was to provide six bullet points, one for each year I’ve run my publishing company. Ultimately, I realized that each of those six points could use some...
exhausted

“Broke Down And Busted In The Promised Land”

Man, are you exhausted or what? I know I am. We all are, right? In fact, I was thinking of titling today's blog post Exhausted, but then the phrase "broke down and busted" drifted into my mind. It comes from a song by a band called The Hilltops, which eventually...
cover design

The Importance of Cover Design and Interior Design for Novels

I think I could be forgiven for not being an expert on either cover or interior design. After all, I studied neither in college. So I hope I'll be forgiven by anyone thinking I have expertise in these subjects. Still, in a world where employers regularly place ads...
Presidents’ Day: Crappy Holiday Or The Crappiest Holiday?

Presidents’ Day: Crappy Holiday Or The Crappiest Holiday?

“The buck stops here.” —Harry S. Truman

“Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.” —John F. Kennedy

“I don’t take any responsibility at all.” —That guy

 

I’m old—so old I remember when we celebrated George Washington’s birthday and Abraham Lincoln’s birthday as two separate holidays. Now we only get one. What a ripoff!

At least that’s what I thought until I Wikipedia’d it. Turns out only some states—my home state of Connecticut being one—celebrate Lincoln’s birthday with a day off. It’s never been a federal holiday.

What the heck?

I guess you never stop learning. My original plan today was to write about how cheesy it was that the government consolidated the two holidays into one. But that never happened. 

Nope, I just moved out of Connecticut—where, presumably, they still celebrate Honest Abe’s birthday with a well-deserved day off.

 

About That Whole Presidential Power Thing…

So now that my original Presidents’ Day post idea has been derailed by my own ignorance, what am I even going to write?

Well, I immediately started to wonder, why wouldn’t President Lincoln be celebrated with a federal holiday? And then I remembered: there have always been many racists in many states, and people who actively celebrated Lincoln’s assassination—just as there were many who celebrated when Kennedy was assassinated. Of course Congress wouldn’t honor Lincoln with a federal holiday.

Even as we try to recover from the PTSD inflicted on us over the last four years, we still continue to grieve. Even as we try to feel like there will be some kind of return to normalcy with good ol’ Joe in the White House, this past weekend brought a stark reminder of the worst presidential power can do—a lawless, amoral monster, even after he’s out of the official seat of power, still remains above the law.

Not guilty, they said. And so it goes.

 

What Will Our Recovery, If Any, Look Like?

And now, lurching into a future where the presidency has been perhaps hopelessly sullied—far more than we’d ever imagined in our worst Nixonian nightmares—what will a recovery look like? Is one even possible?

For the far-right diehards, there’s no such thing. The present is already a dystopian hellscape, littered with the triumphs of communism and socialism (what’s the difference, right?), and the future looks bleak.

For the far-left, center-left, center, and center-right—in other words, for those who still haven’t lost their minds completely—I guess we just have to hope for the best.

drum

“I Want to Bang on the Drum All Day”

Ever have an old song pop into your head and then it’s just there all day?  For those of you reading this who are old enough to get the reference, today’s blog post title comes from a Todd Rundgren song from the early 80s, “Bang the Drum All Day.” Todd Rundgren was...
technophobia

Technophobia: A Writer’s Confession

To today's computer-savvy readers, "technophobia" might sound like a quaint leftover from the 20th century. You remember, right? Back in the 1980s, guys like me wrote poems of dismay about the invasion of technology into the arts. I still remember the words I penned...
remember 80s

Remember The 80s? Placing Scenes in History in My Most Recent Novel

Remember the 80s? How about the 70s, or even the 60s? Of course, I know the old expression: if you remember the 60s, you weren't there. But in my house, it was different. I was born in the 60s, but in my house it was pretty much like the 50s. No discussion of the war...
artists

Calling All Artists

This week's blog post is going to be super short: if you've ever read the blog, you’ll know I'm posting often about my upcoming book launch. I’m releasing my fourth novel in 2019, and I’m putting a lot of emphasis on finding artists first. I put out a call for graphic...
followers

Frances Caballo on Why You Should Never Buy Twitter Followers or Facebook Likes

I don't often feature guest posts on my blog, but today's post is a special exception. Social media guru Frances Caballo graciously accepted my invitation to guest here.If you don't know Frances, you should: she's the author of numerous books on social media for...
book

Who Gives A Damn About Your Book?

Back in April, I wrote a blog post called What I’ve Learned in Six Years of Growing An Indie Author Business. Since I have  those six years of experience, I figured I’d list six things I’d learned—not necessarily one per year, but one for each year. The response was...

Five Mistakes New Authors Make

Every author starts as a newbie, even if they held a job as a writer in some other capacity. The publishing business can be incredibly daunting for a newcomer: many authors work alone without much feedback, so their mistakes, while understandable, are also far too...
marketing

Why I Don’t Want You to Buy My Latest Book—Yet

​One of the biggest challenges indie authors face is that of marketing. We ask ourselves a million questions when putting together a marketing plan, often with answers that are hazy at best. Who is my audience? Where do they find books? What marketing services should...
market

How Do You Sell A Book in the Digital Age? Market, Market, Market

"I need a steam shovel, mama, to keep away the dead / I need a dump truck, baby, to unload my head." —Bob Dylan   Sometimes these days we all feel like the guy in today's photo, right? A head full of books—both paper and electronic—and a million tasks that need...
break

Taking A Break

Today I'm taking a break from the regular weekly blog post—not because everyone is exhausted (which is true enough) but because we had a four-hour blackout in my neighborhood this afternoon! So now I'm too busy to create anything new, and time has run out....
Anti-Vaxxer Hysteria and the Mo-ron Contingent

Anti-Vaxxer Hysteria and the Mo-ron Contingent

I can’t help but wonder: what kind of idiot do you have to be to believe that Bill Gates has nothing better to do than follow you around while you schlep to Wal-Mart, pick up your dry cleaning, and eat the free breadsticks at Olive Garden?

I’ve always got my cell phone with me, and when I get an idea, I’ve been known to record it with the Voice Memos app rather than wait until I get someplace where I can write it down. Such was the case with the above thought about the anti-vaxxers making the news this month.

There was a timenot too long ago, in factwhen we’d pretty much eradicated polio, measles, and smallpox. I say “pretty much” because, thanks to a few quacks and nutjobs (and the inevitable grind of poverty), we’re not 100% out of the woods on anything except smallpox.

 

If You Can’t Call Them Mo-rons…

I got started on this anti-vaxxer tirade when I saw an article about it, but I didn’t actually write anything on the subject until I had the above thought. Sometimes I save such things for a character’s dialogueand I may yet put those words in the mouth of someone in my current WIPbut for now, I thought I’d claim them as my own.

The reason I’ve tied the anti-vaxxer movement to the idea of, uh, let’s call it mental feebleness, came about this weekend. I’ve been reading through a song-by-song analysis of the works of the late, great Frank Zappa, a big influence on my sense of humor when I was growing up.

In this particular forum, the moderators are very strict about using language they deem offensive…which could make it pretty difficult to discuss Zappa! Well, one of the posters wanted to use the word moron, but found it was verboten on the site…just like four-letter profanities.

But smart people have a way of getting around such things, so he tried writing it as mo-ron, and voila! It worked. This made me smile. In fact, it made me laugh out loud.

And I decided to use it myself. So I have to ask: if we can’t call these anti-vaxxer types wack jobs, religious fanatics, or loony tunes, can we at least call them idiots or morons?

Okay, okay: mo-rons. Got it.

running

Running & Writing: A Classic Combo

Writing and running. It’s one of the oldest and, to my way of thinking, weirdest connections in the world. I’ve been a writer, truly, since 1979. Over these past forty years, I’ve written hundreds of poems and songs, and a handful of publishable short stories. (I’ve...
Game of Thrones

Game of Thrones and Storytelling

Writing is a funny game. You make stuff up and it goes from your head to your fingers, then to a screen via keyboard, or a page via writing implement. But of course, we all know that's not the oldest way of telling stories. Really, stories began with cave drawings and...

Memorial Day 2019

I don't have a special message for Memorial Day. I never do.In fact, looking back through the archives for previous years' messages, I see I don't have any. Maybe I deleted them to save space on the server. Perhaps I deleted something in an effort to avoid courting...

Talk of der Führer at the Local Library??

This past weekend I had a pretty weird, disturbing experience related to Nazism, which I only documented on my personal Facebook page. In retrospect, it's probably just as good for blog fodder as anything else. I must be a little naive, because somehow I've managed to...
writer

Are You The Kind Of Writer Who Reads A Lot?

When I was in high school, I had a real dilemma: I loved the books the teachers assigned us, and as a result, the teachers loved me. Naturally, that meant some of the other students hated me. Now, I should clarify this by saying that I didn't always love what I was...
political

Navigating the Murky Waters of Political Correctness

“If you don't have a sense of humor, it just isn't funny.”  —Wavy Gravy   When it comes to political correctness, I’m not convinced we should go back to the “good old days.” I mean, do we really want to go back to calling someone born to an unwed mother a...
book-building

Book-Building 101

This week's post is called Book-Building 101 because I want to provide my fellow indie authors a little info on the mechanics of putting out a completed book. And I'm not talking about plot, structure, or basics like editing or proofreading. I'm talking about the...
California

California Dreamin’: Researching the 5th Biggest Economy in the World

Today's post is more than a mere reference to an old Mamas and Papas song. It's also a little bit about my experience. Let me explain. I'm a New Englander. Born and raised, as they say, in Connecticut, which I've often referred to as "just a suburb of New York City."...
fumes

Running On Fumes: Pandemic Fatigue

Let’s face: the past four years have been exhausting. But 2020 is a whole other level of exhausting. If you’re running on fumes right now—and I’ll be the first to admit that’s the case for me—who can blame you? Ordinarily, I have a schedule for these blog posts, and...
coming-of-age

Dreams, Memories, And Growing Up One Day At A Time

We use up too much artistry in our dreams—and therefore often are impoverished during the day. - Friedrich Nietzsche, The Wanderer and His Shadow   Boy, ole Nietzsche really had it right, didn’t he? Last night I went through mental movies that ranged from being...
No More For The Road

No More For The Road

I took my last drink 32 years ago. Hard to believe I’ve reached that many years of continuous sobriety.

If you’d asked me the day before I stopped drinking whether I had an alcohol problem, I would have said No. Mainly because I didn’t think I did. What I had was an alcohol solution. When I took a drink, I was no longer the bespectacled kid who scored in the 99th percentile on a bunch of national tests. Instead, I became the cool guy with the long hair and the rebel attitude.

Alcohol solved so many adolescent problems for me: I could dance (badly), make people laugh, and I even became something of a Casanova. No way did I ever see it as a problem, and almost no one called me out on my habit.

But I say almost, because there was one person I vaguely recollect saying something at a party. The conversation went something like this:

Non-drunk person: “Boy, you really like to drink, don’t you?”

Me: “I’m a writer. Writers drink.”

And with that, I took another one.

I had writer heroes: Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hemingway.

There were musical heroes, too: Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison, and Janis Joplin. Yeah, I was that guy.

Once I sobered up that icy Connecticut day in February, 1989, I still had no idea there was a problem. As soon as I stopped, though, I sure found out. Detoxing at home without medication was no fun. Afterwards, I felt like I couldn’t function at all.

I’d just finished grad school, yet couldn’t read a full paragraph without losing my sense of what the words meant.

Everywhere I went, I felt like someone had stripped off all of my skin and a chill wind was blowing on my exposed nerve ends.

Learning to live without my “solution” was like learning to live without your dominant hand…like the main character I ultimately created in Brothers’ Hand, my first novel.

 

“And The Years Went Rolling By…”

So what does all this have to do with my most recent book, Whizzers?

A few people have asked me some personal questions relating to my own work, and I’m afraid my answers have often been vague at best. “There are autobiographical elements to certain characters here and there, but it’s really fiction.” That kind of thing.

It’s always hard for any of us to see ourselves objectively, but there’s a connection, for sure. If Brothers’ Hand was metaphorical, Whizzers is much closer to autobiographical.

When I launched the novel in 2019, I had no idea it would hit #9 on an Amazon Hot List. Today I celebrate 32 years of sobriety, but my own story is far from over: I’ve got a lot of work left to do and more stories to tell.

The fictional version of me in Whizzers gets to go back in time to bring comfort to others, mainly other alcoholics and addicts. It’s still fiction, though. In reality, I can only hope the book helps someoneeven if only as entertainment, a respite from their own reality.

I’m not someone who’s reached the level of fame where I think I have an audience for a memoir or autobiography. But if my life in recovery has taught me anything, it’s that my primary purpose here is to help others, one way or another. And in some ways, that’s what Whizzers is all about.

For that, I am truly grateful.

team

Come Join My Book Launch Team!

A few months ago, I wrote a blog about book launches where I introduced the subtle difference between a launch team and a street team. Simply stated, there’s usually plenty of overlap, but a launch team may include people not part of your street team – vendors, people...
attorney

The Power of an Attorney

Last week I missed the deadline to post my Monday blog, then missed any other opportunity through the rest of the week. The reason? I'm power of attorney for my mother, who took a fall and had to be hospitalized. Hence the headline for this week's post. Being power of...
newsletter

Got Those Old Indie Author Newsletter Blues

It’s Monday again, and that means it’s time for my weekly blog post. Today I’m going to talk a bit about newsletters—more specifically, the kind of newsletter an indie author like myself sends to his readers. For those of you who aren’t familiar with the concept, an...

Writers Kickin’ It Old-School

Today was one of those days when I thought I might have to start kickin' it old-school. Not even halfway through the afternoon, my brand new modem/router went on the fritz. Suddenly, I couldn't work. My day was already well-planned out, with social media posts for...

Strictly Business

So lately I've been looking a little bit like this guy - although this dude is younger, and probably better-looking, than me.  I mean I've been hunched over an iMac or MacBook quite a bit, working furiously on building my business. Now, I know that the people who...

Who You Gonna Call? or Being Your Own Tech Support

I wrote my third novel between about 2007 and 2015. I can’t say it took a full eight years to write – I got stuck in the final third for a couple years – but it was an ambitious project. I’d gone from a third person novel to a first person novel, and now I was going...
spirituality

Spirituality in the Fictional World

Almost two years ago, I wrote a post called Talking About A Metaphysical Work where I tried to discuss spirituality in fiction. At least, that's what I thought I was doing. See, I had just published my fourth novel, Whizzers, and I knew I needed to promote it. I had a...
deadline

I’d Never Missed a Deadline Before—Until I Missed My Own

I’ll be the first to acknowledge my willingness to write about the newsletter I send to my email list. In fact, I know I’ve done it more than once. Back in February, I offered readers of this blog a “sneak peek” at the quarterly newsletter—the joke being that it...
litfic

Leaving the Litfic Category Behind?

Today’s blog is NOT an advertisement for products or services I offer. However, I do want to extend an invitation to join my email newsletter list to get content that’s (mostly) not available elsewhere.One thing about the author life that never fails to entertain is...

Radio, Radio

Last month, I had the pleasure of being the guest on a terrific radio show for authors: the Joy on Paper program hosted by PatZi Gil. PatZi was kind enough to invite me on the show to talk not only about my third novel Miles of Files, but also about my company, Sahno...
The Problem With Guilt-Inducing Advice

The Problem With Guilt-Inducing Advice

I frequently see tweets asking, “What’s the worst writing advice you’ve ever heard?” I don’t know if I want to comment on that, exactly, but I do have something else in mind.

Probably the biggest cliché writers will ever hear is some variation on the old saw, Write every day. When I was in grad school, I took a course with an anthologized short story author who asked the class, on day one, “Are you all writers? You all write every day?”

I took that second question personally. My internal answer was something like, “Well, um…no…not every day.”

And then I felt guilty about it.

 

“Compulsive Drivenness”

I suspect it takes a particular kind of empathy to understand just how bizarre my internal guilt really was. I was a student. Majoring in writing. I’d never been paid a dime for writing anything, and would not, for years afterwards. But what I did have was what the late great John Gardner so accurately called “compulsive drivenness.” I was a poet, a songwriter, a short story writer, and well on my way to becoming a novelist.

Today I write for a living. I’ve worked for the better part of two decades as a full-time professional writerbut prior to that, I was already the author of a couple of unpublished novels, and working on a third. Those novels are all available today thanks to stick-to-itiveness, compulsive drivenness, and a very understanding wife. Oh, and I’ve written and published an additional fourth novel and a collection of short stories. Novel #5 is underway as I write this post.

So what’s wrong with the “write every day” advice?

Nothing, if you need that sort of thing to motivate you. Nothing, if you’re creating content for quick, ready consumption.

But if you’re already compulsively driven to write, and will keep on writing year after year whether you get paid for it or not, you don’t need that advice. In fact, you might want to try to forget you ever heard it.

 

Better Than Ever

When I started writing each of my first two novels, I was working full-time outside the publishing world. I was a writer only in my own world. Was I any less of a writer? Did I suddenly cease to be a writer when I took a day off from it? When I went on vacation, or read a book, or looked out the window?

No.

And yet…because I’m an introvert and an empath and a poet, because I’m a writer of literary fiction whose primary goal is art, not commerce, I took that advice far too much to heart. I slaved over my books like a madman, but when I took a breakbecause I needed one, or because I feared the well had run dryI felt guilty for not writing. To be clear, I’m not saying that professor made me feel bad. For some writers, Write every day would have been the best advice. Just not for me.

A wise man once said to me, “Screw guilt.” I say to you, “Screw guilt.” If you’re going to write, you’ll do it. Job or no job, spouse or no spouse, inspiration or no inspiration. And if you take off a day, or even a week, you might come back refreshed. You might come back better than ever. I know I did.

excellence

Literary Excellence and Why Writers Need to Be Readers

Back when I first launched my company, I often used the phrase literary excellence as part of my branding. The idea was that Sahno Publishing evolved out of the notion that literary excellence is more important than a financial formula. The company entered the...
ledge

Nightmare On Acid Street

In my mind, I flash back to a time years ago, and the image strikes me with peculiar clarity—the dismal boarding house where I lived when I was newly sober, the shattering acid flashback with its neon cockroaches skittering across the dirty ceiling. Then, further back...
morning

5 Things to Do Before You Begin Your Writing Day

What should you do before you start your writing day? I've read plenty of advice on topics like this over the years, and I have to say upfront: I don't think there's a right way or a wrong way. You have to do what works for you. However, I've also tried to do things...
editor

Need A Writer? An Editor? A Proofreader? How About All Of The Above?

Late last week I got a call from a husband and wife asking about vanity publishers. Yes, such predatory companies are still out there, preying on the hopeful. These nice folks asked me if it sounded legit when a "publisher" offered to put the wife's book out for a...
coming-of-age

Dreams, Memories, And Growing Up One Day At A Time

We use up too much artistry in our dreams—and therefore often are impoverished during the day. - Friedrich Nietzsche, The Wanderer and His Shadow   Boy, ole Nietzsche really had it right, didn’t he? Last night I went through mental movies that ranged from being...
California

California Dreamin’: Researching the 5th Biggest Economy in the World

Today's post is more than a mere reference to an old Mamas and Papas song. It's also a little bit about my experience. Let me explain. I'm a New Englander. Born and raised, as they say, in Connecticut, which I've often referred to as "just a suburb of New York City."...
metaphysics

Psychology Is Sort of a Hobby of Mine, or Why I’ve Always Been So Interested In Metaphysics

I chose the image above for today's blog post for a couple reasons: first, it's cool, but second, it's also kind of all over the place. And isn't that what metaphysics are all about?A quick Google search shows the definition of metaphysics as "a field of philosophy...
punches

Roll With The Punches, Baby!

Today is just one of those Mondays. I got a letter from the IRS that said they "believe there's a miscalculation" in my return. So that big $300 refund I was planning on receiving? Fuhgeddaboutit. But hey, at least I don't owe them anything, and they're not auditing...
president

Vote Like Your Life Depends On It—Then Let It Go

​In 1994, I wrote a novel called Brothers’ Hand, in which the titular character mentions that someday working class people might very well use billionaire “Duncan Scrump’s” name as a curse word one day. Of course, I never imagined such a person could become our...
fumes

Running On Fumes: Pandemic Fatigue

Let’s face: the past four years have been exhausting. But 2020 is a whole other level of exhausting. If you’re running on fumes right now—and I’ll be the first to admit that’s the case for me—who can blame you? Ordinarily, I have a schedule for these blog posts, and...