Radio, Radio

Radio, Radio

Normally, when I’ve done radio shows, it’s been related to promotion of a novel, or of my novels in general.

This week, it’s something completely different. (If you got the Monty Python reference, kudos. If not, Google them after you read this post. Then thank me in the comments if you ever make it back!)

This Thursday, I’m actually being interviewed twice – and those interviews will be available online. I’ll post links as soon as I have them.

On the first show, I’ll be interviewed by Dr. Gayle Carson, also known as the S.O.B. (That stands for Spunky Old Broad. What were you thinking?) Dr. Gayle has led quite an amazing life. If I had a radio show, I’d be wanting to interview her.

We met at an event, and the good doctor has since interviewed a couple other people from that same event. That includes Dustin Matthews, co-founder of Speaking Empire. Dr. Gayle does multiple radio shows, and on this one I’ll be talking about “Living Regret Free.”

The second interview will be with Dr. Jaime Kulaga. Dr. Jaime is a business coach and Licensed Mental Health Counselor, and I’ll be sharing some tips on creativity with her. Again, more info on where to find these recordings as soon as I have it.

If you’d like me as a guest – either speaking at your event or as a guest on your show – contact me via email at info@msahno.com or phone at (813) 528-2622. You can find audio clips of other appearances here on the Press Kit page.

Have a great week…and Happy Halloween!

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Networking Tips for People Over 60

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The Power of Story

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My Weird Juneteenth Reading Experience

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Top Ten Words or Phrases That Make You Cringe

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Writers, Don’t Forget to Write It Down!

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Vote Like Your Life Depends On It—Then Let It Go

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Another Monday Blog Post – And a Special Offer

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Technophobia: A Writer’s Confession

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Nobody Likes Being Sick—But The Coronavirus Is Making People Scared Of Even Getting Sick

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Is It Important to Be Part of a Community of Writers?

Is It Important to Be Part of a Community of Writers?

I just returned from a meeting of the Bay Area Professional Writers Guild, a terrific organization that brings together writers of all types to network, share resources, and provide education. It made me realize what a small world this is, as the guest speaker was someone I’ve followed on social media…we just hadn’t connected in real life.

My reason for attending the meeting was not because I’m already a member, but because I’ve been invited to be next month’s speaker. More on that later. But the event itself got me thinking: how much of a community do writers today really need, and how do we benefit from it?

I’ll be the first to admit that, like my character Creatine in Rides From Strangers, I’m “not much of a joiner.” I only belong to a couple of organizations. And I’m enough of an introvert that I find attendance at large functions to be pretty exhausting. As a business owner, however, I need to get out there and not only speak to groups but also network within them.

Community In A Community

Writers work alone, so I can understand why many of us wouldn’t want to spend too much time with other people. That’s time we could be writing, or at least playing around on the internet! I once attended a critique group, and found it excruciatingly dull. I don’t think I’d want to join their group, though I did have a writer’s group of my own many moons ago.

Today, we are so plugged in that it can actually be refreshing to spend time around real living, breathing human beings. And as for online community, that can be beneficial too. I’ve become online pals with a few fellow writers, and we have actively promoted each other’s work, along with reading and reviewing it.

Personally, I’d rather split my time between being alone and being with others, but I definitely see the value in being part of a community of some sort…whether online or in person, or both.

Upcoming Events

And that brings me to my last point this week: my upcoming events are split between radio and in-person! I’ll be appearing on a radio show hosted by Dr. Gayle Carson, also known as the Spunky Old Broad, next month. We will chat on November 2nd, and when it’s up, the recording will be available here.

And as I mentioned at the beginning, I’ll be speaking to the Bay Area Professional Writers Guild on November 27th at 1:00pm. Details about the BAPWG may be found on their website.

Have a great week, everybody, and get out there and be a part of your community.

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Frances Caballo on Why You Should Never Buy Twitter Followers or Facebook Likes

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Short Story Contest Part III

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The Improtance Of Poorfreading

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Indie Authors & Literary Fiction

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3 Reasons the End of Game of Thrones is an Example of Good Storytelling

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If You Don’t Write in a Serial Format, Good Luck With Amazon Classifications

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Author Newsletters

Author Newsletters

I’ll be the first to admit I am not an expert on author email newsletters. However, I believe they’re important, and I try to be on top of mine every month. Today’s blog post is about that.

Normally I send out a newsletter to my email list each month on the 6th. Not sure why I picked that date, unless it’s because my birthday is November 6th (coming up soon, folks; oh, and I like chocolate). Anyway, the newsletters are pretty much private: I don’t share the content on my Facebook page or tweet a link to my 16K Twitter followers. It just seems better for the folks who subscribe to get them exclusively.

This month’s newsletter, however, got a tremendous response. I mentioned that I’d love it if folks shared it with their friends or colleagues, because I’d like to get Rides From Strangers into the hands of more readers. And after I sent the newsletter, I got a flurry of new signups to the list! So thanks to all who forwarded it, and welcome to my new subscribers.

Here is the meat of the newsletter:

This month, I’ve been busily promoting my new short story collection Rides From Strangers. More on that below. I also finished ghostwriting a book for a business coach, worked on building the speaking side of Sahno Publishing, and wrote a book review for a fellow author.

First, the book review. A while back, Ben East wrote a four-star review for Miles of Files on Amazon. I figured the least I could do is repay the favor, so I read his new novel, Patchworks. It’s a savage indictment of the NRA and K Street, so that’s right up my alley. I’ve got an “introductory” review on Amazon and Goodreads, but for the full review of Patchworks, check out my latest blog entry here.

Just one event announcement, which I’ll be making a couple more times: I’m appearing at the Dunedin Public Library on Saturday, Dec. 9th as part of the annual Local Author Showcase. More details available here.

As for my own books, I’d really like to invite you to pass this newsletter on to your friends. I’d love to get more readers for Rides From Strangers, which is still available FREE to subscribers. If you haven’t yet downloaded your copy to your Kindle device, here are the instructions once again, courtesy of Amazon. Meanwhile, please feel free to forward this newsletter to folks you think would find it of interest.

If you haven’t gotten a copy of Miles of FilesBrothers’ Hand, or Jana yet, they’re still available at a 30% discount price on Amazon. Get them this month, though, before the price goes back to normal! Email me your receipt at info@msahno.com, with a link to your Amazon or Goodreads review, and I’ll send you more exclusive content.

That’s about it. The Rides From Strangers collection is only available to newsletter subscribers, so get your free copy here.

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Anti-Vaxxer Hysteria and the Mo-ron Contingent

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A Sneak Peek at My Latest Quarterly Newsletter—And An Invitation

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Working on Novels

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And So The Tour Ends

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Authors As Self-Marketers

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Patchworks: A Book Review

Patchworks: A Book Review

Today I woke to the all-too-familiar tragic news of yet another mass shooting. Sadly, we all know what will happen next: politicians will sputter, talking heads will bloviate, and the next thing that gets done about gun control will be – absolutely nothing.

Such is the subject of Ben East’s hard-edged new novel, Patchworks. The narrator, Gabriel “Gabe” Dunne, is a Washington, D.C. intern, stuck in a rather unglamorous position. Overly awed by his soon-to-be-married supervisor Chloe’s magnificent breasts, and sufferer of unrequited lust for a local divorcee named Darlene, Gabe is something of an enigma.

Interestingly, Gabe’s fellow characters often think of the archangel when they hear his name, though the messenger of God called Gabriel is traditionally a female angel. On the surface, Gabe seems to be the closest thing D.C. has to a Boy Scout. But his private thoughts, conveyed only to the reader, reveal him as a reluctant admirer of the casual playboy in the office, a rakish troglodyte with the oddly bookish name of Harcourt. Gabe describes Harcourt, perhaps ironically, as a born winner who “deserved to win.”

So is Gabe something of an angel, as his co-workers seem to see him? Or is he just another self-deluded do-gooder, a prototypical unreliable narrator with a powerful lust for heavy-bosomed women…women like Chloe, whom he sees as a “blonde sweetheart posing as professional?”

Unfortunately, there’s the rub: Gabriel goes on an admirable, utterly quixotic campaign against the NRA, but even that feeble attempt to break free from the shackles of the government “cube farm” seems motivated less by an angelic nature than by the tragic deaths of a colleague’s children in a school shooting. In other words, like Nancy Reagan with stem cell research or Dick Cheney with gay rights, it seems that Gabe becomes truly interested in a major issue like gun control only after it affects him personally.

The characters in Patchworks are almost universally conflicted, and although most of their conflicts are held at arm’s length from the reader – conveyed second-hand by the righteous Gabe – author East does a fine job of making them sympathetic. At worst, a few of them are ciphers; at best, the kind of characters one feels are true, but just as gloriously unknowable as our own friends and colleagues.

In that sense, Patchworks is something of a patchwork itself, like the shirt cobbled together by a school shooting victim’s father: admirably cobbling together the disparate stories of a motley bunch, connected through circumstance and the perhaps-unreliable point of view of an enigmatic narrator. Though it left me with mixed emotions, I can’t help but recommend it for these bleak times.

For more on East and his work, check out https://beneastbooks.com.

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Racism In The Time Of Corona

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Goin’ Home

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Memorial Day 2019

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